Music

Broods: ‘Heartlines’

New Zealand band Broods released a tech-driven music video for their single, "Heartlines," using the Microsoft Band. The fitness tracker measured lead singer Georgia Nott's heart rate as she performed in the video, translating her biodata and energy into a stunning geometric display.

In summer 2016, New Zealand band Broods released a tech-driven music video for their single, “Heartlines,” using the Microsoft Band. The fitness tracker measured lead singer Georgia Nott’s heart rate as she performed in the video, translating her biodata and energy into a stunning geometric display.

The brother-sister duo, who released their second album, Conscious, on June 24, 2016 via Capitol Records, wanted to rethink the music video experience and create a deeper, more emotional layer for their second single, “Heartlines” ― co-written with fellow New Zealanders, singer-songwriters Lorde and Joel Little.

Broods and Microsoft pushed the boundaries of the music experience with 'Heartlines.'
Watch the video above to go behind-the-scenes during Broods' music video shoot.
The Microsoft Band tracked Georgia's vital signs throughout her performance.
'This type of technology will help integrate the real world with the virtual world,' according to VFX supervisor Carlos Aldana.
'I don't think that a lot of people would've seen anything like this before,' says Georgia.
Behind the scenes during the video shoot for 'Heartlines.'

A first-of-its-kind integration, fans got to experience the Band-powered visuals in real time as Broods took the technology on the road for their headlining US tour. The Microsoft Band collected information from the artists as they performed and translated that data into live visuals, creating a new level of intimacy with the audience and a one-of-a-kind music experience.

See the 'Heartlines' of electronic pop duo Broods thanks to Microsoft Band

Microsoft Band entered the fitness tracker business in 2014, delivering a new and effective tool to people striving to live healthier lives. But its developers probably never imagined that the wristband meant to track workout goals and calorie burned would become an integral piece of performance art.